93 notes
  

donewithwoodenteeth:

aryastarque said: 

there’s nothing wrong with arya not wanting to fulfill a role that is meant to restrict her. even part of catelyn’s pov deals with her struggle to live within the societal limitations of being a lady.

Amen. People need to stop equating being anti-patriarchy with being anti-women.

appreciate the sentiment which gave rise to this notion (i.e. that women who don’t actively go against- or even enjoy- the set rules and positions patriarchal society gives them are not to be taken as anti-feminist or “lesser” in some way,) but it’s gotten absurd. 

A female character who wants options for her life, who dislikes being considered lesser as a woman, who finds it absurd that she doesn’t get treated with equality/respect/whatever merely because she’s not a man, who likes to do not traditional feminine things or isn’t good at traditional feminine things, isn’t wrong or bad for that. 

Like that’s crazy. There’s a reason this is (was) celebrated in the eyes of many, because it’s disagreement with patriarchal values that are harmful. It’s standing up against a sexist system. 

I’ve spoken about how I think that Sansa’s been negatively impacted by fitting the rigid mold of a highborn lady before, Catelyn point blank calls Robb out on how girls aren’t considered as important in anger because this is- at that point to her- the difference between life and death with her daughters, this is not a good thing. 

While we should acknowledge that it’s important to not look down on women who abide by these rules, it’s just as important to recognize that there’s nothing wrong with not wanting to abide by them.

Arya doesn’t want to be seen as a lady multiple times because she knows that means that her life is going to be controlled by others and forced on paths that she has no choice in. Being upset about that? 100% okay. In fact, it shows a lot of self-awareness and an ability to see beyond what authority tells her. It’s perceptiveness and intelligence that allow her to see that.

In fact, both Arya and Sansa develop insecurities over their bonds with people just because they are highborn ladies.

The thought made Sansa weary. All she knew of Robert Arryn was that he was a little boy, and sickly. It is not me she wants her son to marry, it is my claim. No one will ever marry me for love.  Sansa, ASoS

Hot Pie and Gendry had left her just as soon as they could, and Lord Beric and the outlaws only wanted to ransom her, just like the Hound. None of them wanted her around. They were never my pack, not even Hot Pie and Gendry. I was stupid to think so, just a stupid little girl, and no wolf at all. Arya, ASoS

After being treated as a piece, a bargaining chip, both sisters have since developed a sense of distrust of anyone showing interest in them. Sansa, who began the series as someone with great dreams of her wedding/future husband, is convinced no one would ever marry her for her- only her status. Arya, who began the series as someone constantly making friends/looking for them and valuing friendship so highly, now believes no one could possibly want her around for her- only her status matters.

Women are treated like bargaining chips in this society. This is beyond harmful, and Arya recognizing it as unfair and sometimes disliking being a lady because of it is not wrong at all. 

My only point was that Arya does think of herself as highborn lady and doesn’t hate it like people assume. She understandably has issues with it though sometimes.

#this this this this this this this #arya stark #thank you #don't tell me that characters like arya aren't necessary anymore



217 notes
  

fuckyestyrion:

→ Tyrion arrived late, saddlesore, and sour, all too vividly aware of how amusing he must look as he waddled up the slope to his father. 

#tyrion lannister #tywin lannister



Thank you everyone who participated in my survey! I had more than enough responses. You all are awesome!




8 notes

Hey, followers!

I’m doing a survey for my class on English Education in the 21st Century, and I need people to take it. It’s only ten questions and should only take a few minutes. Thanks a lot :)

Take the survey here.




242,278 notes
  
little-rose-pond:

thedragonbornlives:

not-all-cannibals:

paintyoubarakat:

eneko-wweh:

mr-egbutt:

tyleroakley:

witchhctiw:

the-solitary-witch:

warriorsatthedisco:

Its called the Death Waltz, and was written as a joke but people have attempted it on piano.

Saxes move downstage.

I’ll just leave this here.

SWEET JESUS CLICK THAT




the added directions are great.'insert peanuts''gradually become irritated''cresc., or not''untie slip knot''bow real fast, slippage may occur'

'release the penguins'

'All harpists stand up and wait''Begin turning flame up slowly''Sell mute'

fave piano piece

"tune the uke"

little-rose-pond:

thedragonbornlives:

not-all-cannibals:

paintyoubarakat:

eneko-wweh:

mr-egbutt:

tyleroakley:

witchhctiw:

the-solitary-witch:

warriorsatthedisco:

Its called the Death Waltz, and was written as a joke but people have attempted it on piano.

Saxes move downstage.

I’ll just leave this here.

SWEET JESUS CLICK THAT

the added directions are great.
'insert peanuts'
'gradually become irritated'
'cresc., or not'
'untie slip knot'
'bow real fast, slippage may occur'

'release the penguins'

'All harpists stand up and wait'
'Begin turning flame up slowly'
'Sell mute'

fave piano piece

"tune the uke"

#music



1,530 notes
  
poc-creators:

Fantasy author NK Jemisin’s Guest of Honor Speech at the Continuum Convention in Australia

And here’s the thing: women have been in SFF from the very beginning. We might not always have been visible, hidden away behind initials and masculine-sounding pseudonyms, quietly running the conventions at which men ran around pinching women’s bottoms, but we were there. And people of color have been in SFF from the very beginning, hiding behind the racial anonymity of names and pseudonyms — and sometimes forcibly prevented from publishing our work by well-meaning editors, lest SFF audiences be troubled by the sight of a brown person in the protagonist’s role. Or a lesbian, or a poor person, or an old person, or a trans woman, or a person in a wheelchair. SFF has always been the literature of the human imagination, not just the imagination of a single demographic. Every culture on this planet produces it in some way, shape, or form. It thrives in video games and films and TV shows, and before that it lived in the oral histories kept by the griots, and the story circles of the Navajo, and the Dreamings of this country’s first peoples. People from every walk of life consume SFF, with relish, and that is because we have all, on some level, contributed to its inception and growth.
We tread upon the mythic ground of religions and civilizations that far predate “Western” nations and Christianity; we dream of traveling amid stars that were named by Arab astronomers, using the numbers they devised to help us find our way; we retell the colonization stories that were life and death for the Irish and the English and the Inka and the Inuit; we find drama in the struggles of the marginalized and not-quite-assimilated of every society. Speculative fiction is at its core syncretic; this stuff doesn’t come out of nowhere. And it certainly didn’t spring solely from the imaginations of a bunch of beardy old middle-class middle-American guys in the 1950s.
….
It is time that we all recognized the real history of this genre, and acknowledged the breadth and diversity of its contributors. It’s time we acknowledged the debt we owe to those who got us here — all of them. It’s time we made note of what ground we’ve trodden upon, and the wrongs we’ve done to those who trod it first. And it’s time we took steps — some symbolic, some substantive — to try and correct those errors. I do not mean a simple removal of the barriers that currently exist within the genre and its fandom, though doing that’s certainly the first step. I mean we must now make an active, conscious effort to establish a literature of the imagination which truly belongs to everyone. MORE

poc-creators:

Fantasy author NK Jemisin’s Guest of Honor Speech at the Continuum Convention in Australia

And here’s the thing: women have been in SFF from the very beginning. We might not always have been visible, hidden away behind initials and masculine-sounding pseudonyms, quietly running the conventions at which men ran around pinching women’s bottoms, but we were there. And people of color have been in SFF from the very beginning, hiding behind the racial anonymity of names and pseudonyms — and sometimes forcibly prevented from publishing our work by well-meaning editors, lest SFF audiences be troubled by the sight of a brown person in the protagonist’s role. Or a lesbian, or a poor person, or an old person, or a trans woman, or a person in a wheelchair. SFF has always been the literature of the human imagination, not just the imagination of a single demographic. Every culture on this planet produces it in some way, shape, or form. It thrives in video games and films and TV shows, and before that it lived in the oral histories kept by the griots, and the story circles of the Navajo, and the Dreamings of this country’s first peoples. People from every walk of life consume SFF, with relish, and that is because we have all, on some level, contributed to its inception and growth.

We tread upon the mythic ground of religions and civilizations that far predate “Western” nations and Christianity; we dream of traveling amid stars that were named by Arab astronomers, using the numbers they devised to help us find our way; we retell the colonization stories that were life and death for the Irish and the English and the Inka and the Inuit; we find drama in the struggles of the marginalized and not-quite-assimilated of every society. Speculative fiction is at its core syncretic; this stuff doesn’t come out of nowhere. And it certainly didn’t spring solely from the imaginations of a bunch of beardy old middle-class middle-American guys in the 1950s.

….

It is time that we all recognized the real history of this genre, and acknowledged the breadth and diversity of its contributors. It’s time we acknowledged the debt we owe to those who got us here — all of them. It’s time we made note of what ground we’ve trodden upon, and the wrongs we’ve done to those who trod it first. And it’s time we took steps — some symbolic, some substantive — to try and correct those errors. I do not mean a simple removal of the barriers that currently exist within the genre and its fandom, though doing that’s certainly the first step. I mean we must now make an active, conscious effort to establish a literature of the imagination which truly belongs to everyone. MORE

#literature



1,146 notes
  

galadrielles:

GOT || Season Four Challenge: Day 3 - Favourite Quote

I swore a sacred vow to protect her. 
Why didn’t you?

#brienne of tarth #catelyn stark



2 notes
sarashulip inquired:

Why don't people understand that a character can do horrible things, but you can still love and appreciate the characters for being good characters? Just because you like a character doesn't mean you would be friends with them in real life.

I really don’t know.

#sarashulip



604 notes
  

messyjess1981:

animproperprincess:

westerlander:

secretlyatargaryen:

I mean A Dance with Dragons is so important because this is the book where Tyrion’s humanity is the most in your face. He’s not your inspirational feel-good stereotype, he’s not your comic relief. He’s not the guy who keeps on…

Heh, maybe the show will cut that part. Wouldn’t that be funny?

I’m certain they will. And I’m certain Tyrion haters will continue to complain about it, too, while ignoring all the ways every other character is made softer by the show.




604 notes
  

animproperprincess:

westerlander:

secretlyatargaryen:

I mean A Dance with Dragons is so important because this is the book where Tyrion’s humanity is the most in your face. He’s not your inspirational feel-good stereotype, he’s not your comic relief. He’s not the guy who keeps on smiling and makes jokes and wears his flaws like armor. He’s a mess and he’s awful and he’s depressed and he’s angry and he refuses to sit by and suffer nobly for other people’s benefit.

#thank you #i feel this post in my soul #what i love about tyrion is that he’s a ‘bad victim’ #i.e. he doesn’t show his damage in the ‘right’ ways #he’s not a ‘good’ disabled person #not a ‘good’ depressed person #not a ‘good’ abuse victim #it’s very jarring for readers to encounter a character who doesn’t react nobly to trauma #he makes people uncomfortable #and that’s why he’s a great character #by challenging and exposing their assumptions

ADWD is also the book where Tyrion says he wants to ‘kill and rape his sister’ for revenge.

Tyrion Lannister is not a good person, he’s just as conniving and fucked up as the rest of his family and I’m just so excite for the show to wipe that aspect of his character away.

I like how you felt the need to derail my post celebrating a disabled character to remind me that he’s “not a good person”. I like how tumblr fandom celebrates the Lannisters for being terrible people but Tyrion is hated for being “just as bad”.

#i love the impotent rage of tyrion haters #i eat it for breakfast #haters gonna hate lol